Reviews

Reginald Black

Feb 20, 2017

I can\'t say enough about Kathleen Gingrich. I needed her services at a very difficult time in my life. ...

Deb Hoffert

Feb 08, 2017

I can not say enough great things about this law firm. Everyone is extremely knowledgeable, professional and above all else ...

John Arena

Feb 01, 2017

Peter Russo and the staff at his firm have handled my personal and professional business for almost a decade. His ...

rick scott

Feb 01, 2017

Peter was easy to work with and handled my case first class. He was knowledgeable about my case (possible age ...

Jenn Spears Brenize

Feb 01, 2017

Peter is extremely knowledgeable and aggressive, yet even-tempered. He is professional, diligent, and compassionate, and responsive to his clients\' ...

test

Jun 11, 2019

test

kai

Apr 04, 2019

great

Lori Keim

Apr 03, 2019

Taking care of necessary family law issues is not fun; but Peter and his staff made it as painless as ...

Yvonne

Apr 03, 2019

Pete’s office did a fantastic job on my settlement, they made the process very smooth, and ensured I understood ...

Steven Chupa

Mar 19, 2019

Wonderful Attorney! Would recommend to anyone

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Divorcing? Your marriage has not ‘failed’

It can be all too easy to think that because your marriage is ending that it has failed. However, it is likely important for your sense of purpose and for your emotional health that you draw a distinction between dissolution and failure. Once you do so, you will likely be able to navigate the ins and outs of the legal elements of divorce with more focus, intention and peace.

When someone fails at an endeavor, that individual has been unsuccessful at achieving that endeavor. Certainly, when a marriage ends, the couple involved has not been successful at remaining married until death. However, the couple involved has likely succeeded at so many endeavors within the marriage that the union itself cannot reasonably be perceived as “failed.”

For example, when you and your spouse chose to marry, you likely resolved to grow in love, to learn from your experiences and to become more mature as a result of your union. Unless you have made no growth as a person during the course of your marriage and unless you refuse to learn from the experiences you had as a married person, you cannot reasonably be perceived as having failed at married life.

Not all unions last forever. But simply because these unions end does not mean that they have failed. Failure is an unfair label to slap onto most marriages that end. Because few individuals walk away from their marriages having stagnated in their personal growth and having refused to learn from their experiences.

Source: The Huffington Post, “11 Reasons There’s No Such Thing As A ‘Failed Marriage’,” Brittany Wong, May 28, 2015