Is social media bad for marriages?

Has social media made it harder for couples to stay together? At least one marriage counselor suspects that texts, Tweets, emails and Facebook may make it easier for spouses to cheat on each other.

For example, the convenience of technology may have impacted how cheating spouses carry out their clandestine affair. Specifically, technology has allowed cheating spouses to maintain more constant communication with each other. Even just a few years ago, cheating spouses might have had fewer options for maintaining conversations in between meetings, such as brief, stolen moments on the telephone. Now, however, a text can be sent from a password-protected smartphone in seconds, and aliases can be used to protect the identities of the text or email participants.

Although many couples might be able to mend after an affair, a divorce attorney might prove a helpful resource for spouses who think a fresh start would be in their best interests. An attorney might be able to approach the topic in a manner that results in a no-fault divorce. An attorney might also be able to point out the financial expense of protracted or contested divorce proceedings. In light of the anticipated cost, a spouse might even agree to alternatives to divorce litigation, such as medication or collaborative law.

However, if one spouse is not cooperative, he or she might contest the grounds for a no-fault divorce. For example, the other spouse might assert that the marriage is irretrievably broken. In cases where the couple has not lived apart for at least two years and the other spouse does not provide consent to the divorce, an attorney might have other options to suggest. Specifically, there are several grounds for a fault-based divorce under Pennsylvania law. Adultery, committed by a cheating spouse, is one such reason.

Source: 
First Coast News: “Local marriage counselor weighs in on sexting scandals,” July 24, 2013