Reviews

Reginald Black

Feb 20, 2017

I can\'t say enough about Kathleen Gingrich. I needed her services at a very difficult time in my life. ...

Deb Hoffert

Feb 08, 2017

I can not say enough great things about this law firm. Everyone is extremely knowledgeable, professional and above all else ...

John Arena

Feb 01, 2017

Peter Russo and the staff at his firm have handled my personal and professional business for almost a decade. His ...

rick scott

Feb 01, 2017

Peter was easy to work with and handled my case first class. He was knowledgeable about my case (possible age ...

Jenn Spears Brenize

Feb 01, 2017

Peter is extremely knowledgeable and aggressive, yet even-tempered. He is professional, diligent, and compassionate, and responsive to his clients\' ...

Robert Davis

Jul 25, 2018

WERE BACK !! First and foremost Peter has a sense of humor. Peter was efficient and effective and on point when ...

Angela Reighard

Jun 26, 2018

Kara Haggerty was an amazing attorney. She handled my highly toxic divorce with aplomb, carefully and skillfully. Megan was also ...

Bob Levin

May 11, 2018

I have been working with Peter for last 3 years and the experience has been worthwhile. He is a man of ...

Beth Sizer

Mar 22, 2018

I am a grandmother who just wants to be involved with her only grandson\'s life in every way, watch ...

Aubrey

Jan 10, 2018

Peter is an excellent attorney! He is caring and effective in his representations.

Review By:

Are you leaving or have you been left by your spouse?

When approaching the divorce process, it is important to keep in mind any biases that you may have which may negatively impact your ability to secure a fair divorce settlement. In particular, nearly every spouse either struggles with either the bias of having left his or her spouse or having been left by his or her spouse.

How can leaving or being left color your divorce process? These biases can color your process in a number of ways. First, it can color which approach you opt to take in resolving your divorce. If you have left, you may be so eager to have the process finished that you fail to fight for property or rights you believe in. If you have been left, you may be so hurt that you opt to fight over issues that do not truly warrant the emotional and financial costs of the fight. These are just two examples of how either being the one who has left or the one who has been left can color your approach to the process.

Similarly, these biases can affect your approach to property division. If leaving has left you feeling guilty, you may be willing to sacrifice much of your property in order to calm your conscience. If you have been left, you may be willing to sacrifice important property just to have the process move along so that you can gain time to heal.

There is no one “right” way to approach either the divorce process or property division. However, it is important to be aware of the biases you may have that could potentially impact your divorce for the better or worse.

Source: The Huffington Post, €œHow Leaving or Being Left Changes the Emotional Aspect of Divorce,” Stephanie D. Lewis, Jan. 29, 2015